Have you seen the video where Jo Milne hears for the first time in her life? This is why fundraising makes Sense to us

Thursday, July 10, 2014

Raising money for charity has been part and parcel of Foresters' commitment to making a positive contribution to people's lives. Our annual charity for 2014/2015 is Sense, and here's why we're supporting it…

If you've seen the video that captures the moment 40-year old Jo Milne hears for the first time after having her cochlear implants switched on, it's something you'll never forget. People all over the world clicked to view and it quickly went viral after being posted on YouTube earlier this year.

Overcome with emotion and fighting back the tears as her doctor recites the days of the week, Jo later said this was the most emotional and overwhelming experience of her life. As you might have guessed, it's a bit of a tearjerker.

 

Jo suffers from a rare condition called Usher Syndrome, which left her deaf from birth and started to claim her sight in her mid-20s. Her story received worldwide coverage, perfectly illustrating the incredible work of the deafblind charity Sense.

Sense has provided support for Jo through the years, and she in turn works for the Sense Usher Specialist Service Team, helping to raise awareness of Usher Syndrome and providing support for others with the condition.

Sense helps people every day

Sense UK 1Jo's is a high-profile story, but Sense makes a real difference every day for thousands of children and adults with dual hearing and sight impairments, tailoring a wide range of support and services for each individual so that they can live fulfilling lives and enjoy the world around them.

To find out how they do this, click here

Why Sense?

Each year we support a different cause through our President's Annual Charity Appeal. Our new President, David Watkins, was elected to represent Foresters' members last month and he chose Sense for 2014-2015. Explaining his choice, he said: "Can you imagine what it must be like? Try closing your eyes in complete silence - that's what some of these people live with and somebody's got to support them and show them how they can enjoy life. That's what Sense does."

How can you support Sense?

Sense UK 2Over the next year, we'll be encouraging Foresters' members to raise money for Sense through our branch network, which organises fundraising events. We've had great success in the past, raising more than £60,000 for the children's charity Barnardo's last year via all sorts of events - from skittles tournaments and quiz nights to sponsored cycle rides. Two members even climbed Kilimanjaro, raising a whopping £11,000!

To join other Foresters members in fundraising and regular social and community events, contact your local branch

Find out more about Sense and its work here>> 

 

Foresters: a charitable history

Charity was once so vital that it literally made the difference between survival and destitution. Before the days of the welfare state there was no sick pay or benefits, so there was a real risk that a family could become hungry and homeless if their breadwinner fell ill or became too old to work.

Strength in numbers

Russian Dolls

Friendly Societies, such as Foresters, sprang up to provide essential financial and social support. In 1745, a group of people set up Royal Foresters with the aim of helping each other out as they "walked through the forests of life". Paying a little every week into a mutual fund meant that if one of them got ill they would be able to draw on the money. Royal Foresters became The Ancient Order of Foresters in 1834 and eventually Foresters Friendly Society, the mutual financial organisation that it is today - one with a strong benevolent spirit. 

 
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